Monthly Archives: November 2012

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    Cheryl Brown’s office sent this press release, which even though this is not a news site nor an aggregator, the readership might be interested in reading this information, since the only other place I have seen it is in the Black Voice News:

    In recognition of Small Business Saturday on November 24, Assemblymember-Elect Cheryl R. Brown (D-47) patronized small businesses located in the 47thAssembly District to encourage everyone to shop local and shop small.

    “I’ve owned a small business for almost 40 years and I understand the challenges and sacrifices that business owners encounter daily. I deeply admire and respect the contributions that our small businesses make to the communities in our district,” said Brown.

    Small Business Saturday has attracted millions of consumers nationwide since its formation in 2010. Small Business Saturday occurs annually between Black Friday and Cyber Monday and encourages the nation to celebrate their local businesses by “shopping small.”

    “Reportedly, two-thirds of jobs in the 47th District are provided by small businesses,” said Brown. “And nationally for the last two decades small businesses have created two of every three jobs in the United States.”

    Encouraging small business growth and job creation are among Brown’s top legislative priorities for 2013.

    “Promoting small business growth and job creation is important to me because our district suffers from some of the highest unemployment rates in the state,” said Brown.“In many of our sectors, the unemployment rate has reached double digits. We have to look at how we can create more jobs and strengthen our local economy.”

    “Government policies can pave the way for small businesses to thrive,” said Brown.

    Assemblymember-Elect Brown represents the 47th Assembly District, which includes San Bernardino, Rialto, Colton, Bloomington, Fontana, and Grand Terrace.

    And because I try to add value and not just aggregate information found elsewhere, as a small business owner, and since I have small business clients, I am glad to see Assemblymember-Elect Brown visit local businesses and promoting small businesses.

    While this site focuses on electoral politics, there is certainly a role that government, particularly the California state government can have to be friendly to small business owners.  Many business owners state that they do not like government interference in our free enterprise system, but large businesses often use regulations as barriers to entry for smaller competitors.

    As far as the State Legislature, I would like to point out one law that was passed, AB 1616, which can spur the creation of micro-businesses in at least one field.  The findings of the bill that created this new law are:

    (a) Small businesses have played an important role in helping slow economies recover and prosper as an engine of job creation. During the 1990s, small businesses created the majority of new jobs and now account for 65 percent of United States employment.
    (b) California, and the United States as a whole, are facing growing obesity and obesity-related disease epidemics.
    (1) Two-thirds of American adults and nearly one-third of children and teens are obese or overweight, placing them at risk for developing chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.
    (2) One in every nine California children, one in three teens, and over half of adults are already overweight or obese. This epidemic affects virtually all Californians.
    (3) These health conditions are preventable and curable through lifestyle choices that include consumption of healthy fresh foods.
    (c) For decades, low-income and rural communities have faced limited opportunities to purchase healthy foods. Often, without cars or convenient public transportation options, low-income residents in these areas must rely for much of their shopping on expensive, fatty, processed foods sold at convenience and corner stores.
    (d) There is a growing movement in California to support community-based food production, sometimes referred to as “cottage food,” “artisanal food,” “slow food,” “locally based food,” or “urban agriculture” movements. These movements seek to connect food to local communities, small businesses, and environmental sustainability.
    (e) Increased opportunities for entrepreneur development through microenterprises can help to supplement household incomes, prevent poverty and hunger, and strengthen local economies.
    (f) At least 32 other states have passed laws that allow small business entrepreneurs to use their home kitchens to prepare, for sale, foods that are not potentially hazardous.
    (g) Even some bake sales are currently illegal in California.
    (h) It is the intent of the Legislature to enact a homemade food act specifically designed to help address these challenges and opportunities.
    In that spirit, I wish Assemblymember-Elect Brown good luck in her new term, and sincere wishes that more can be done in the spirit of AB1616 in deregulating the barriers to starting and sustaining new businesses.  As an assemblymember, Cheryl Brown can write laws that help middle class Californians and micro and small businesses expand their businesses without weakening consumer or health and safety protections.

     

     

    1. Massive buckets of money can win against an established local candidate.

    2. Never let yourself be photographed sleeping.

    3. In the top-two primary era, particularly with two Republicans running in a plurality Democratic district, make sure not to make too big a deal about your political beliefs.

    Here are the semi-official results in the San Bernardino County Elections, with an emphasis on those races of most important to the City of San Bernardino, the focus of this site:

    These are semi-official results from the November 6, 2012 statewide General Election, which as you may know, coincided with a national presidential election.

    These numbers are from the San Bernardino Registrar of  Voters stats updated at 6:05 a.m. on November 7, 2012.  They will be next updated at 5 p.m.

    Starting with Congress, in Congressional District 8,  Paul Cook appears to have bested Gregg Imus in San Bernardino County 58.15 percent to 41.86 percent with 133,948 votes counted.  According to the Secretary of State (since there are non-San Bernardino County votes in the district (including Mono and Inyo, Paul Cook won by 57.6 percent (82,653 votes), to Gregg Imus’ 42.4 percent (60,732), as of 6:19 a.m.

    In District 31, the Republican-on-Republican violence has ended, with Representative Gary Miller (R-Brea/Diamond-Bar) officially becoming Gary Miller (R-Rancho Cucamonga).  Gary Miller has garnered 68,892 votes so far, for 55.19 percent of the vote, and Bob Dutton getting 55,940 votes at 44.81 percent of the vote.  We’ll look at the implications of this race on the future of San Bernardino politics later.

    In District 35, the battle between local Democrats Gloria Negrete McLeod appears to have defeated Working Joe Baca.  In San Bernardino County, the vote count is currently 46,627 (53.96 percent) to Joe Baca’s 39,788 (46.04 percent).   The Secretary of State has it as Gloria Negrete McLeod at 60,866 votes (55.7 percent), to Joe Baca’s 48,385 (44.3 percent), with 100 percent reporting.  Congressional District 35 has precincts in both Los Angeles and San Bernardino counties.

    Mike Morrell, the Republican candidate has beaten Democrat Russ Warner, by more than 2,000 votes, 51,954 to 49,104 votes.  The contest was for the 40th Assembly District.

    The Baca family misfortune continued with Cheryl R. Brown handily defeating Rialto Council member Joe Baca Jr. for State Assembly District 47.  This district is completely in San Bernardino County, with Cheryl Brown winning 40,871 votes (56.2 percent), and Joe Baca, Jr. winning 31,811 votes (43.8 percent).

    In the San Bernardino Community College District, Gloria Macias Harrison was the big winner with 52,160 votes (16.10 percent), with John Longville, an incumbent, winning the second of four at-large seats, with 42,411 votes (13.09 percent).  The third position goes to Kathleen Henry with 38,344 votes (11.84 percent), whose ballot designation is educator.  In fourth is Nick Zumbos, with 33,573 votes, barely edging out incumbent John Futch, who had 32,490 votes.  That means that one incumbent, John Longville, was reelected, while John Futch, Jess Vizcaino, Jr., and Carleton W. Lockwood, Jr. all lost. Further, with James Ramos winning the Third District Supervisor race, the San Bernardino Community College Board of Trustees is going to look very different.

    Which brings us to the County Supervisor races.  Of course, Josie Gonzales was not on the ballot, having won the primary in June. In the Third District County Supervisor’s Race, Neil Derry lost decisively to James C. Ramos.  Ramos won 53,653 votes (59.09 percent) to incumbent and former San Bernardino City Council member Neil Derry’s 37,143 votes (40.91 percent).  In the First District, which is generally the desert portions of San Bernardino County, a tighter race between Rick Roelle and Robert A. Lovingood.  Lovingood won 38,640 votes (51.22 percent of the vote) to Rick Roelle’s 36,798 votes (48.78 percent).

    In San Bernardino’s sister cities, briefly, Eileen Gomez was reelected as City Clerk handily, only a single candidate was running for City Treasurer, Aurerlio De La Torre, Frank J. Navarro beat Vincent Yzaguirre for Colton City Council District 3, Deirdre H. Bennett won handily in a three person race in District 5 (64.05 percent), and Isaac Suchil won in District 6.

    In Grand Terrace, two new faces appear to have won City Council seats, Sylvia A. Robles, and Jackie Mitchell, with incumbent Darcy McNaboe winning reelection.  Though it is close, it appears that incumbent Lee Ann Garcia has lost, coming in fourth for three seats, by a margin of less than 200 votes with 100 percent of precincts reporting.

    In Highland, both incumbents, John Timmer and Penny Lilburn were reelected, leaving the status quo in the City of Highland.   In Redlands, Mayor Pete Aguilar was resoundingly reelected, with 9,171 votes, 27.24 percent of the total in a seven person race for two seats.  Former Mayor Pat Gilbreath was returned to the Council, coming in second with 6,651 votes, a little less than 500 votes for then next highest vote-getter.  City Clerk stayed the same, and Robert Dawes was elected City Treasurer resoundingly in a three person race., winning 61.81 percent of the votes (10,792).

    In Rialto, Deborah Robertson defeated Ed Scott, and Shawn P. O’Connell  and Ed Palmer were elected to City Council. City Clerk and City Treasurer ran in Soviet-style one person elections.

    Of interest, in the San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District election for Division 2, Gil Navarro beat George Aguilar 8,755 votes to 7,049.

    San Bernardino City Unified School District Measure N, a bond measure, won overwhelmingly,  with 69.60 percent of the vote, needing 55 percent for passage.

    Lastly, Measure Q, put on the ballot by the Board of Supervisors as sort of a poison pill against the citizen initiative Measure R, received more votes than Measure R.  Measure Q received 269,973 votes out of 400,522 votes (67.41 percent), with Measure R receiving receiving 256,014 votes out of 398,468 cast (64.25 percent).

    Measure V in Rialto passed.