Monthly Archives: January 2013

    I interrupt the scintillating series on the Form 700sof the Common Council of the City of San Bernardino for another news release from the Larry Walker campaign.  Why do I always print the releases from Larry Walker (asked no one in particular)? Because they send them to me.

    Chino, California – San Bernardino County Auditor-Controller Larry Walker announced today that his campaign for State Senate has won the endorsements of Congresswoman Gloria Negrete McLeod and Former Assemblymember John Longville.  Negrete McLeod and Longville join a growing list of Walker supports that already includes San Bernardino County Supervisors Josie Gonzales and Janice Rutherford, San Bernardino County District Attorney Michael Ramos, Former San Bernardino County Sheriff Rod Hoops and a number of local leaders.

     

    “I have known Larry Walker for many years now and I have witnessed a public servant who puts the best interests of Inland Empire residents first,” said Negrete McLeod.  “I am proud to endorse Larry Walker for the California State Senate and I look forward to playing an active role in his campaign.”

     

    “Larry Walker is a tireless advocate for the working families here in our neighborhoods.  He will bring to Sacramento a laser focus on San Bernardino and Los Angeles counties job creation and economic development,” said Longville.  “Larry’s experience, energy, and skills were vital when we worked together to create our Metrolink commuter rail system two decades ago, and those same qualities will help all Californians when we send him to the State Senate.  I am excited to endorse his campaign.”

     

    Negrete McLeod resigned from representing California’s 32nd Senate District earlier this year so she could represent the majority of the area in Congress.  She previously served in the California State Assembly and as a member of the Chaffey College Governing Board.  Longville previously represented portions of San Bernardino County in the State Assembly and served as a Councilmember and Mayor in the City of Rialto.  He currently serves as a Trustee on the San Bernardino Community College District and as a Board Member of the San Bernardino Valley Water Conservation District.

     

    Walker, a Democrat, has represented large portions of State Senate District 32 as a local elected leader for over thirty years.  He currently represents all of San Bernardino County as the elected Auditor-Controller.  He previously represented the cites of Chino, Ontario, Montclair and a portion of Fontana for three terms on the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors.  Prior to that, he served as a City Councilmember and Mayor in the City of Chino.  Larry, his wife Carri, and their sons Mac, Will, and Tyler, live in Chino.

     

    California’s 32nd State Senate District encompasses the cities of Colton, Fontana, Montclair, Ontario, Rialto, San Bernardino and part of Chino, and the unincorporated communities of Bloomington and Muscoy in San Bernardino County; and the City of Pomona in Los Angeles County.  The Special Primary Election to replace Congresswoman Gloria Negrete McLeod in the State Senate will be held on March 12.

     

    Form 700 is the Statement of Economic Interest that elected officials, high-level officials, and other people designated by an entities’ conflict of interest code must file disclosing their economic interests.  In a short series, here is a look at the Form 700s (2011/2012) of the San Bernardino Common Council, yesterday looked at the First Ward, Council member Virginia Marquez, and today will look at the Second Ward, Robert Jenkins’ Form 700 for 2011/2012

    Council member Robert David Jenkins filed his 2011/2012 Form 700 with the City Clerk on March 29, 2012.  The California Fair Political Practices Commission received it on April 12, 2012.  The form is mostly typed, which makes sense considering that there is a fill-able PDF available online.

    After the cover page, there are two schedules attached, D and E. Schedule D is for gifts.  Looking at the instructions on the current version of the form (2012/2013), which is not the same as looking at the regulations, the instructions for Schedule D says “A gift is anything of value for which you have not provided equal or greater consideration to the donor.  A gift is reportable if the fair market value is $50 or more.  In addition, multiple gifts totaling $50 or more received during the reporting period from a single source must be reported.”  What was the gift limit in 2011/2012 according to the FPPC?  $420, the same as the current amount.

    Council Member Jenkins’ Schedule D has two gifts outlined.  The first is a gift received March 26, 2011.  This was before Robert Jenkins became a City Council member because the election was July 12, 2011.  The gift came

    from the Community Action Partnerships [sic], 696 S. Tippecanoe Ave., San Bernardino 92415, with no business purpose listed.  The value of the gift is listed by Council member Jenkins as

    This is not the law blog, but to make it clear, the regulations in effect at the time of the disclosure exempted this reported gift as a gift under the regulations, and exempted it from the gift limit:

    2 Cal.Code of Regs. section 18942 (a)(10), in effect for the 2011/2012 Form 700

     

    § 18942. Exceptions to Gift and Exceptions to Gift Limits.(a) For purposes of Section 82028, none of the following is a gift and none is subject to any limitation on gifts:

    (10) Payments received under a government agency program or a program established by a bona fide charitable organization exempt from taxation under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code designed to provide disaster relief or food, shelter, or similar assistance to qualified recipients if such payments are available to members of the public without regard to official status.
    The Community Action Partnership of San Bernardino is, according to its website, “a private non-profit public benefit corporation with a 501(c) (3) status. “

    From what I gather from CAPSB’s website, they administered Federal ARRA energy efficiency/weatherization funds.

    The second gift is from “Evelyn [sic] Wilcox” the owner of Manpower San Bernardino.  The gift was given on November 21, 2011, with a value of $85, and was a ticket to a San Bernardino Valley College Gala.  No other gifts are listed on Schedule D.

    Schedule E (Income – Gifts, Travel Payments, Advances and Reimbursements is the final schedule attached to Council member Jenkins’ 2011/2012 Form 700.  It says the firefighters union gave Council member Jenkins $678 as a gift between June 2, 2011 and June 3, 2011 for travel for filming a campaign commercial.  Again, I am not sure this counts as a “gift” because the same regulation cited above, subsection (a) (4) exempts a campaign contribution that is required to be reported.  If I were to guess, it would be for this campaign commercial, uploaded in June 2011.

    There is no other information on Council member Jenkins’ Form 700 from 2011/2012.  You can see that sometimes public officials disclose information that they are not required to.

    Form 700 is the Statement of Economic Interest that elected officials, high-level officials, and other people designated by an entities’ conflict of interest code must file disclosing their economic interests.  In a short series, here is a look at the Form 700s (2011/2012) of the San Bernardino Common Council, starting numerically with the First Ward, Council member Virginia Marquez.

    Council member Marquez filed her 2011/2012 Form 700 with the City Clerk on February 28, 2012.  The California Fair Political Practices Commission received it on April 12, 2012.  The form is handwritten.

    After the cover page, the first schedule attached is Schedule B, Interests in Real Property (Including Rental Income).  Council member Marquez acquired a property in the 92404 zip code.  Even though it has an address with the county numbering system, a check of the assessor’s parcel map (which is only intended for the purpose of ad valorem taxation, but is commonly used for other purposes, shows that the property is within the City of San Bernardino.  The tax collector records online confirm that Council member Marquez acquired the property on the date she said she acquired the property on the Form 700. Council member Marquez does not claim any gross rental income from the property.  The fair market value claimed is in line with the assessed amount of the property found on the latest tax bill.  It appears, though I cannot confirm, that the property in question is currently in the 7th Ward.

    Form 700 on its face states “You are not required to report loans from commercial lending institutions made in the lender’s regular course of business on terms available to members of the public without regard to your official status.”  However, Council member Marquez appears to report such a loan, a thirty-year loan at 4.875 percent interest from Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.  There is of course, no harm to the public about disclosing more information than is required.  In other capacities, I have seen public officials over-disclose.

    No other information is provided on Council member Marquez’s Statement of Economic Interest Form 700 for 2011/2012.  The next in the series will be the Second Ward.

     

    From the Larry Walker for Senate Campaign:

    Chino, California – San Bernardino County District Attorney Michael Ramos and Former San Bernardino County Sheriff Rod Hoops announced their support of Auditor-Controller Larry Walker’s campaign for State Senate today.  The public safety leaders join a growing list of Walker supports that includes the San Bernardino County Safety Employees Benefit Association (SEBA) and San Bernardino County Supervisors Josie Gonzales and Janice Rutherford.

     

    “Larry Walker is an experienced, effective, common sense leader that understands the challenges our region faces,” said San Bernardino County District Attorney Michael Ramos.  “We can trust him to stand up for us in Sacramento.  He will fight for our fair share of resources and won’t be afraid to tackle the tough issues facing our state.”

     

    “Larry Walker has a long record working to keep Inland Empire families safe,” said Former San Bernardino County Sheriff Rod Hoops.   “He understands the need to find creative ways to crack down on gangs, expand after school programs that keep our kids safe and protect funding for frontline law enforcement services.  I am proud to endorse his campaign for State Senate.”

     

    Walker has represented large portions of State Senate District 32 as a local elected leader for over thirty years.  He currently represents all of San Bernardino County as the elected Auditor-Controller.  He previously represented the cites of Chino, Ontario, Montclair and a portion of Fontana for three terms on the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors.  Prior to that, he served as a City Councilmember and Mayor in the City of Chino.  Larry, his wife Carri, and their sons Mac, Will, and Tyler, live in Chino.

     

    California’s 32nd State Senate District encompasses the cities of Colton, Fontana, Montclair, Ontario, Rialto, San Bernardino and part of Chino, and the unincorporated communities of Bloomington and Muscoy in San Bernardino County; and the City of Pomona in Los Angeles County.  The Special Primary Election to replace Congresswoman Gloria Negrete McLeod in the State Senate will be held on March 12.

    We interrupt the regularly scheduled republishing of campaign and officeholder press releases to provide some slightly original content at the core of this site’s mission, whatever that may be.

    In addition to the 2013 San Bernardino Mayoral Election primary to be held on November 5, 2013, the City Charter of the City of San Bernardino has this to say about elections to the Common Council:

    Section 13. Officers Elected. There shall be elected at the general
    election in 1998, and every fourth year thereafter three members of the Common
    Council, one each from the First, Second and Fourth Wards, who shall have been
    qualified electors and residents of their respective wards for a period of at least
    thirty (30) consecutive days next preceding the date of filing of their nomination
    papers for the office and who shall be elected by the qualified electors of their
    respective wards for terms of four years commencing on the first Monday in March
    next succeeding their elections.

    1998?  That would mean the elections for First, Second, and Fourth Wards should have been held in 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010, and then 2014.  History shows that it was in 1997, 2001, 2005, 2009 and now in 2013.  For guidance, we turn to Section 10.

    Section 10. Primary and General Election. A primary election shall be
    held in said City on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in March of each odd
    numbered year, for the nomination of candidates to be elected at the ensuing
    general election, and a general election shall be held in said City on the first
    Tuesday in May of each odd numbered year, for the election of City officers.
    Beginning with the primary election in 1995, and thereafter a primary election shall
    be held in said City on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November in each
    odd numbered year for the nomination of candidates to be elected at the ensuing
    general election, and a general election shall be held in said City on the first
    Tuesday in February of the following even numbered year for the election of City
    Officers. Said election shall be conducted in the manner provided for by general
    law; provided, however, that the Mayor and Common Council shall have power, by
    ordinance, to provide for the manner of holding such election.

    Well, then.  The elections in 1997, 2001, 2005, 2009 and 2013 were are are primaries.  If someone wins a majority in the primary:

    Section 10-A. Election to Office. Any candidate for any City office who at
    a primary election shall receive votes on a majority of all the ballots cast for
    candidates for the office for which such candidates seek nomination, shall be
    elected to such office. Where two or more candidates are to be elected to a given
    office and a greater number of candidates receive a majority than the number to be
    elected, those candidates shall be elected who secure the highest votes of those
    receiving such majority, and equal in number to the number to be elected. Any
    officer elected shall hold office until his or her successor is elected and qualifies.

    Therefore, the answer to the question of “when are the elections for San Bernardino Council?” is the First Ward, Second Ward, and Fourth Ward Council elections are on November 5, 2013.  However, these are primaries, if there are three or more candidates, and no candidate receives a majority, the general election is held in February 2014.

    More news in a press release from Larry Walker for State Senate

    Six More Local Leaders Back Larry Walker for State Senate

    Chino, California – San Bernardino County Auditor-Controller Larry Walker announced today that his campaign for State Senate has won the endorsements of six more local elected leaders.  The list includes Chino City Councilmember Glenn Duncan, Montclair Mayor Paul Eaton, Montclair Councilmember John Dutrey, Ontario City Councilmember Jim Bowman, Upland City Councilmember Brendan Brandt and Chaffey Joint Union High School District Boardmember Charles Uhalley.  Earlier this month, Walker announced the support of San Bernardino County Supervisors Josie Gonzales and Janice Rutherford.

    “After thirty years in local government, Larry Walker understands the importance of local control,” said Montclair Mayor Paul Eaton.  “The state government could learn a thing or two from the local governments of San Bernardino County.  I support Larry Walker for State Senate because he will always stand up for our local neighborhoods, not for Sacramento special interests.”

    “I endorse Larry Walker because he has been a great friend of education.  Larry Walker understands that educating our children is a comprehensive process – it’s about nutrition, about after school programs, about extra-curricular enrichment – and he will be a strong ally at the state level to provide us resources that the School Board can’t provide,” said Chaffey Join Union High School District Boardmember Charles Uhalley.  “From his time as Mayor of Chino to his time in County government, Larry Walker has always fought to make sure that our children’s education is fully funded, and I believe he will continue to do so in the State Senate.”

    “Larry Walker is a man of integrity and honesty, a man who you can always rely on to get things done,” said Upland City Councilmember Brendan Brandt.  “I endorse Larry Walker because he is the rare public servant with the vision that it will take to grow our economy, fix our budget, and preserve core public services.”

    Walker has represented large portions of State Senate District 32 as a local elected leader for over thirty years.  He currently represents all of San Bernardino County as the elected Auditor-Controller.  He previously represented the cites of Chino, Ontario, Montclair and a portion of Fontana for three terms on the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors.  Prior to that, he served as a City Councilmember and Mayor in the City of Chino.  Larry, his wife Carri, and their sons Mac, Will, and Tyler, live in Chino.

    California’s 32nd State Senate District encompasses the cities of Colton, Fontana, Montclair, Ontario, Rialto, San Bernardino and part of Chino, and the unincorporated communities of Bloomington and Muscoy in San Bernardino County; and the City of Pomona in Los Angeles County.  The Special Primary Election to replace Congresswoman Gloria Negrete McLeod in the State Senate will be held on March 12.

    According to the San Bernardino County Registrar of Voters’ website, two candidates were issued nomination papers on January 10, 2013: Larry Walker, whose press releases have been featured prominently here, and Paul Vincent Avila.  Governor Jerry Brown called a special election for Tuesday, March 12, 2013 for the seat vacated by Gloria Negrete McLeod, who resigned to serve in the United States House of Representatives California 35.  The candidate deadline is January 18, 2013.  The alphabet drawing for ballot primacy will be held on January 21, 2013, and early voting begins on February 11, 2013.  The voter registration deadline is February 25, 2013, and the last day to apply to vote by mail is March 5, 2013.   The Special Primary Election for State Senate District 32 is March 12, 2013, and the canvass begins on March 13, 2013.  Under the top two primary system, the top two candidates, no matter if there are only two candidates in the primary election, will stand for election in the Special General Election to be held May 14, 2013.  The Los Angeles County Registrar of Voters only has generic candidate information at this time.

    The three options for San Bernardino County voters (District 32 also includes portions of Los Angeles County) are to vote early, vote by mail, or vote at a physical polling place.  As of today, two candidates have taken out papers, Larry Walker, who I have written about numerous times before, and Paul Vincent Avila, Ontario City Council Member and perennial candidate

    Many voters in the district know about Larry Walker since he is a countywide elected official and has held other offices, but because this is a blog primarily for and about the people of the City of San Bernardino, here is a little of what I gathered about Paul Vincent Avila and his frequent runs for office:

    He was a candidate for or member of  the following offices at the following times:

    1. Member, Ontario City Council, Elected November 6, 2012: Paul Vincent Avila, 9,876 votes, second highest to Debra Porada’s 12,042, the remaining candidates were Robert Tippin, 2,272 votes, Ruben Valencia, 7,654 votes, Paul C. Mimmack, 3,230 votes, Sheila Mautz, 7,148 votes, C. Muhammad, 2,256 votes, John B. Lira, 2,044 votes, and  Josie S. Estrada, 5,651 votes.

    2. Candidate, California Assembly, District 52, Primary June 5, 2012: Paul Vincent Avila, 3,417 votes, Ray Moors, 1,969 votes, Kenny Coble, 9,729 votes, Norma J. Torres, 10,851 votes.  Top two, Kenny Coble and Norma J. Torres advanced to the General Election on November 6, 2012.

    3. Member, Ontario-Montclair School District (Top three elected), November 2, 2010: Paul Vincent Avila (elected), 7,753 votes, Elvia M. Rivas (elected), 6,899 votes, David Campio, 4,177 votes, J. Steve Garcia, 6,173 votes, Kris Brake (elected), 7,595, votes, Sandra Escamilla, 4,512 votes, Benjamin Lopez, 4,213 votes, Christopher Agrella, 1,960 votes.

    4. Candidate, Democratic Primary, California Board of Equalization, June 8, 2010, District 2: Paul Vincent Avila  138,441 votes, Chris Parker,220,120 votes, Mark L. Stebbins, 87,514 votes.

    5. Candidate, Governing Board Chaffey Community College District Board, November 3, 2009: (Top two elected): Paul Vincent Avila, 5,512 votes, Irene Hernandez-Blair, 5,491 votes, Christopher Agrella, 3,245 votes, Katie Roberts, 15,203 votes, Kathleen “Kathy” Brugger, 14,328 votes.

    6. Candidate, Ontario City Council, November 4, 2008: Paul Vincent Avila, 10,346 votes, Sheila Mautz (elected), 12,698 votes, Debra Porada (elected), 10,783 votes, Jason Anderson, 9,377 votes, Ken White, 6,614 votes, Jack Cunningham, 4,543 votes, Hossein Nikyar, 959 votes.

    7. Candidate, Democratic Primary, California Assembly, District 61, June 3, 2008, Paul Vincent Avila, 2,019 votes, Norma J. Torres (primary winner), 5,297 votes, Ken White, 2,961 votes, Maurice E. Ayala, 1,077 votes.

    8. Candidate, Governing Board Chaffey Community College District Board, November 6, 2007: (Top three elected): Paul Vincent Avila, 8,512 votes, Gary L. George (elected) 14,828 votes, Lee C. McDougal (elected), 14,304 votes, Paul J. Gomez, 11,514 votes(elected), Gregg T. Ross, 9,579 votes, Write-in, 210 votes.

    9. Candidate, Council Member, City of Ontario (Top two elected), November 7, 2006: Paul Vincent Avila, 3,770 votes, Alan Wapner (elected) 7,105 votes, Jim W. Bowman (elected), 6,978 votes, Gabe Chavez, 6,361 votes, Samuel Crowe, 5,347 votes, Josie S. Estrada, 4,773 votes, Tony Ballardo, 2,196 votes, Write-in, 59 votes.

    10. Candidate, Democratic Primary, California Assembly, District 61, 2006: Paul Vincent Avila, 4,495 votes, Nell Soto (advanced), 10,565 votes, Write-in (SB County only), 44 votes.

    11. Member, Ontario-Montclair School District, November 8, 2005, elected, (Top Three elected): Paul Vincent Avila, 7,573 votes (elected), Julian Steve Garcia (elected), 9,832 votes, Debra Porada (elected), 7,901 votes, David Van Fleet, 7,280 votes, James B. Downs, 6,956 votes, Write-in, 119 votes.

    12. Candidate, Council Member, City of Ontario (Top two elected), November 2, 2004: Paul Vincent Avila, 4,451 votes, Paul S. Leon (elected), 13,971 votes, Jason Anderson (elected, 8,555 votes, Debra Dorst-Porada, 7,035 votes, Jose “Tony” Ballardo, 4,694 votes, Susan C. Melanson, 4,356 votes, Mike Milliner, 3,959 votes, Richard R. Galvez, 3,108 votes, Katie Bent, 1,695 votes, Michael Voeltz, 1,354 votes, Al Dubiel, 508 votes, Write-in, 133 votes.

    13. Candidate, Council Member, City of Ontario (Top two elected), November 2, 2004: Paul Vincent Avila, 3,505 votes, Alan Wapner (elected), 6,398 votes, Gerald “Jerry” Dubois (elected) 6,124 votes, Gabriel Chavez, 5,645 votes, Maricela Sanchez, 3,889 votes, Marianne Perumean, 3,797 votes, Sean M. Moore, 2,222 votes.

    14. Candidate, San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors 4th District, March 5, 2002,: Paul Vincent Avila, 4,829 votes, Fred Aguiar (elected), 20,308 (80.7 percent of the vote).

    15. Candidate, Board of Trustees, Ontario-Montclair Elementary District, November 6, 2001: (Top three elected), Paul Vincent Avila, 1,401 votes, James B. Downs, 1,646 votes, Debra Dorst-Porada, 1,029 votes, Daniel “Dan” Contreras, 743 votes, David Van Fleet, 1,604 votes, Ruben Gonzales, 905 votes, J Steve Garcia, 1478 votes.

    16. Candidate, Chino Basin Water Conservation District, Director Division 3: Paul Vincent Avila: 385 votes, Brent Armstrong, 258 votes, John T. Reddick (elected), 1,211 votes.

    17. Candidate, Council Member, City of Ontario (Top two elected), November 7, 2000: Paul Vincent Avila, 8,945 votes, Paul S. Leon (elected) 11,719 votes, Deborah “Debbie” Acker (elected), 10,158 votes, Ricard R. Galvez, 4,770 votes, Rick Schmollinger, 1,260 votes, Helen A. Seagull, 2,723 votes, Patrick “Pat” King, 9,284 votes.

    18. Candidate,  Open Primary, California Assembly, District 61, March 7, 2000: Paul Vincent Avila (Democrat), 10,089 votes, Gloria Negrete McLeod (Democrat) 16,053 votes, Robert S. “Bob” Demallie (Republican) 9,996 votes, David Kocot (Libertarian), 886 votes, Dennis R. Yates (Republican), 10,667 votes, Edward S. “Eddie” Cortez (Republican), 9,628 votes, Votes not cast, 8,636 votes.

    19. Candidate, Governing Board Chaffey Community College District Board (Vote for 3), November 2, 1999: Paul Vincent Avila: 11,406 votes, Gloria Negrete McLeod (elected) 16,007 votes, Paul J. Gomez (elected), 14,681 votes, Paul A. Treadway (elected), 13,028 votes.

    20. Candidate, Council Member, City of Ontario (Top two elected), November 3, 1998: Paul Vincent Avila, 4,897 votes, Alan Wapner (elected), 7,472 votes, Gerald A. Dubois (elected), 5,798 votes, Debra Dorst-Porada, 2,605 votes, Debbie Acker, 2,608 votes, Jeffry W. Abel, 1,792 votes, Gabriel Chavez, 2,606 votes, John Sabbath, 2,176 votes.

    21. Candidate, Democratic Primary, California State Senate Democratic Primary, District 32, June 2, 1998. Paul Vincent Avila 11,795 votes, Joe Baca 37,321 votes.

    22. Member, Board of Trustees, Ontario-Montclair Elementary District, November 4, 1997: (Top three elected), Paul Vincent Avila (elected), 1,576 votes, David Van Fleet (elected), 2,066 votes, James B. Downs (elected), 2,050 votes, Benjamin Lopez, 1,253 votes, Paul S. Kielsmeir Sr., 1,330 votes.

    23. Candidate, California Assembly, District 61, November 5, 1996: Paul Vincent Avila (Democrat), 32,445 votes, Fred Aguiar (Republican) elected, 44,314 votes, Michael Alan Pilatch (Libertarian), 3,800 votes.

    24. Member, Board of Trustees, Ontario-Montclair Elementary District, November 1993.

    25. Candidate, Democratic Primary, California Assembly, District 61, March 26, 1996: Paul Vincent Avila, 12,969 votes, Votes Not Cast, 4,855 votes.

    He ran for election at least, 25 times, with a record of 7 wins (four for the Ontario-Montclair District, one for the City of Ontario) and 18 losses.  According to the Daily Bulletin, he did not spend any money on his successful Ontario council race.  If he and Larry Walker are the only two candidates for the Special Primary Election, he will have improved to 8-18.

    His wife, Maryanne Margaret Avila, has run in a number of elections, too.

     

     

    The position of Mayor was created by the Charter of 1905.  The 1905 Charter made the term elective every two years until the Charter was changed in the 1970s.

    General Municipal Election April 10, 1905:  Hiram Merritt Barton.

    General Municipal Election April 8, 1907:  John J. “Pop” Hanford.

    General Municipal Election April 1909: Samuel W. McNabb (March 2, 1909 nominating convention) Source: Los Angeles Times March 3, 1909).

    Primary Municipal Election March 14, 1911: Republicans: Ralph E. Swing (562 votes), C.A. Rouse (37), Joseph Bright (82), N.A. Richardson (9) ; Democratic  J.S. Bright (139 votes), C.A. Rouse (120 votes), Ralph E. Swing (125 votes); Socialist N.A. Richardson (23 votes), C.A. Rouse (1 vote). (Source, Minutes of the Mayor and Common Council, March 1911.

    General Municipal Election April 10, 1911:  Joseph S. Bright defeated Ralph E. Swing and N.A. Richardson (Source: Minutes of the Mayor and Common Council April 12, 1911).

    Primary Municipal Election March 18, 1913: Republican: Joseph S. Bright (333 votes), J.W. Cattick (37 votes), W.E. Irving (131 votes), Thomas Holmes (140 votes), L. William Gurr (18 votes); 1 vote each for Ralph E. Swing, B.J. McCormick, W. Keefer, Ben Emerson, P.Caro, W. Grant, R.E. Parmazette, Henry Eckhardt, J. Brice, Parker, J.G. Montgomery, H.H. Chase and Henry Herkelrath. For the Democratic primary: Joseph S. Bright (116 votes), J.W. Catick (35 votes), Thomas Holmes (90 votes), W.E. Irving (14 votes), L. William Gurr  (12 votes), For Socialist: L. William Gurr (92 votes), Thomas Holmes (8 votes), Joseph S. Bright (2 votes) and W.E. Irving (1 vote). For the Prohibition Primary Joseph S. Bright (14 votes), L. William Gurr (1 vote), and W.E. Irving (1 vote).  (Minutes of the Mayor and Common Council March 1913).

    General Municipal Election April 18, 1913: The candidates were to be J.S. Bright (Republican), J.S. Bright (Democratic), L. William Gurr (Socialist) and J.S. Bright (Republican).  It must come as some surprise that  Joseph W. Catick won, in that he wasn’t nominated in the primary election, so something went on.  J.W. Catick was mentioned in the Los Angeles Times of March 16, 1913 as the “only legal candidate.”

    General Municipal Election  April 12, 1915: George H. Wixom beat J.W. Catick by more than 550 votes, and won against Hiram Barton, J.L. Mack and H.C. Seccombe. Over 5000 votes were cast (Los Angeles Times, April 13, 1915)

    Recall Election December 1915: Voters defeated the recall of George H. Wixom. (Los Angeles Times, December 15, 1915)

    General Municipal Election April 9, 1917: Joseph W. Catick (Wet) won by 247 votes over N.A. Richardson (Prohibition) and C.W. Boswell. (Los Angeles Times, April 10, 1917).

    Election 1919: John A. Henderson

    Election 1921: Samuel W. McNabb

    General Municipal Election April 1923: Samuel W. McNabb defeated Joseph Catick  (in the primary, Catick led McNabb by 23 votes, but the primary was “subsequently declared illegal.”  (Los Angles Times, March 26, 1923).

    (Grant Holcomb appointed February 9, 1925 because Samuel W. McNabb appointed U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of California)

    Primary Municipal Election March 1925 Grant Holcomb, Fred A. Wilson, others.

    General Municipal Election April 13, 1925: Grant Holcomb wins (3,290 votes) to Fred A. Wilson (3,124) (source: http://www.sbcity.org/about/history/mystery_photograph.asp).

    Primary Municipal Election March 11, 1927: Ira N. Gilbert and Grant Holcomb are the top two vote-getters. (Source: Los Angeles Times, April 11, 1927).

    General Municipal Election April 11, 1927: Ira N. Gilbert defeats Grant Holcomb by 64 votes. (Source: Los Angeles Times, April 13, 1927).

    General Municipal Election April 1929: John C. Ralphs, Jr. wins against two other candidates.  (Los Angeles Times April 7, 1929).

    General Municipal Election 1931: Ira N. Gilbert defeats J.W. Catick (Los Angeles Times, April 15, 1931).

    Election 1933: Ormonde W. Seccombe elected.

    Election April 8, 1935: Clarence T. Johnson elected.

    Election 1937: Clarence T. Johnson elected.

    Election 1939: Henry C. McAllister elected.

    Election March 17, 1941: Will C. Seccombe elected.

    Election 1943: Will C. Seccombe elected.

    Election 1945: Will C. Seccombe elected.

    Election 1947: James E. Cunningham, Sr. elected.

    Primary Election March 21, 1949: James E. Cunningham, Sr.(5,398 votes, Ormonde Seccombe (3,869 votes), Jess G. Stinson, one other (Los Angeles Times, March 22, 1949).

    General Municipal Election April 12, 1949: James E. Cunnigham, Sr. over Ormonde Seccombe (Los Angeles Times, April 13, 1949).

    (Clarence T. Johnson appointed December 16, 1950, filled term until next municipal election)

    Primary Municipal Election March 1949: George T. Blair, Clarence T. Johnson, and Ormonde Seccombe.

    General Municipal Election April 9, 1951: George T. Blair wins, Clarence T. Johnson in second, Ormonde Seccombe runs as a write-in. (Los Angeles Times, April 10, 1951).

    Primary Municipal Election March, 1953: George T. Blair elected by six votes over four opponents (Los Angeles Times, March 25, 1956).

    General Municipal Election April 12, 1955: Raymond H. Gregory.

    Primary Municipal Election March 16, 1957: Raymond H. Gregory elected (served until December 31, 1957, when he went to the State Senate, then Elwood D. “Mike” Kremer for the remainder of the term); ran against Earl Beach and Ralph Guy (Los Angeles Times March 17, 1957)

    Primary Municipal Election March 17, 1959: Raymond H. Gregory and Mike Kremer (2,995 votes) , Donald G. Maudlin (2,812 votes), Earl Beach (1,211 votes), Gourtney W. Short (1,466 votes), and three others (Los Angeles Times, March 16, 1959, March 18, 1959).

    General Municipal Election April 14, 1959: Preliminary returns Raymond H. Gregory(3,828 votes to Mike Kremer’s 2,803 votes, Donald G. “Bud” Maudlin had 622 votes. (Los Angeles Times, April 15, 1959) (Raymond Gregory won).

    Primary Municipal Election March 21, 1961: Donald G. “Bud” Maudlin and Raymond H. Gregory advance against Ossie S. Lovgren (44 votes)  and William J. Lucas (142 votes). (Los Angeles Times, March 20, 1961, March 22, 1961)

    General Municipal Election April 1961: Donald G. “Bud” Maudlin is elected over  Raymond H. Gregory.

    Primary Municipal Election February 2, 1963: Donald G. “Bud” Maudlin had a slim lead over his closest opponents. (Los Angeles Times February 3, 1963).

    General Municipal Election April 1963: Donald G. “Bud” Maudlin re-elected (11,742 votes) (Los Angeles Times, April 11, 1963).

    Primary Municipal Election February 2, 1965: Al C. Ballard (1997 votes) trailed Donald G. “Bud” Maudlin (1997 votes), Raymond H. Gregory had 1876 votes, and there was one other candidate  (Los Angeles Times, February 3, 1965 and April 14, 1965)

    General Municipal Election April 1965: Al C. Ballard (11,848 votes) defeats Donald G. Maudlin (10,560) (Los Angeles Times, April 14, 1965).

    Primary Municipal Election February 1967: Al C. Ballard elected.

    Primary Municipal Election February 4, 1969: Al C. Ballard, Charles Brame, Robert Henley and four other candidates (Los Angeles Times, February 4, 1969).

    General Municipal Election April 1969: Al C. Ballard (12,178 votes) beats Robert Henley (11,594 votes) (Los Angeles Times, April 9, 1969).

    Primary Municipal Election February 1971: W.R. “Bob” Holcomb defeats eight other candidates (Source: Los Angeles Times, February 4, 1971).

    Charter Amendment November 7, 1972 amends Charter section 14 to make Mayor’s term four years

    Primary Municipal Election February 6, 1973: W.R. “Bob” Holcomb defeats Al C. Ballard (Source: Los Angeles Times, February 8, 1973 (No General Election).

    Primary Municipal Election 1977: W.R. “Bob” Holcomb (Source: Los Angeles Times, March 10, 1977).

    Municipal Election 1981: W.R. “Bob” Holcomb elected.

    Primary Municipal Election March 5, 1985: W.R. Bob Holcomb(7,577 votes), Evlyn Wilcox (7,137), Ralph Hernandez (3,073), Eugene Dougherty (264 votes), Edison P. McDaniels (308 votes) . (Minutes of the MCC  March 18, 1985).

    General Municipal Election May 7, 1985: Evlyn Wilcox (12,655 votes) defeats W.R. “Bob” Holcomb (10,978 votes) (Source: Los Angeles Times May 1985, Agenda Backup 5/13/1985).

    Primary Municipal Election March 7, 1989: W.R. “Bob” Holcomb (6,681 votes), Evlyn Wilcox (5,103 votes), Tom Minor (4,037 votes), John Lightburn (3,351 votes). (MCC Minutes March 13, 1989).

    General Municipal Election May 2, 1989: W.R. “Bob” Holcomb (9,136 votes) defeats Evlyn Wilcox (8,993 votes), Al Ballard (Write-In) (2,056) (Agenda Backup 5/15/1989).

    General Municipal Election May 4, 1993: Tom Minor (8,046 votes), Esther R. Estrada (6,949 votes), Al C. Ballard (3,040 votes), H. Ken Friedman (3 votes). (Request for Council Action, City of San Bernardino, May 1993).

    June 2, 1992 Charter section 10 amended to make primary elections in November, general (run-offs) on First Tuesday in February.

    Primary Municipal Election November 4, 1997: Judith Valles gets the most votes (4,505), Timothy Prince gets the second most votes(3,618 votes), David Oberhelmen, next (3,406), Ann Botts, next (2,464 votes), Paul W. Sanborn next (529 votes), John S. Ballard last with 335 votes) leading to a February general election. (Source: SB Registrar of Voters).

    General Municipal Election February 3, 1998: Judith Valles (8,379 votes) defeats Timothy Prince (5,159 votes) in the general election. (MCC Resolution 98-31).

    Primary Municipal Election November 6, 2001: Judith Valles runs unopposed (7,385 votes). (Source: SB Registrar of Voters).

    Primary Municipal Election 2005: Patrick J. Morris gets the most votes (11,249), James F. Penman gets the second most votes (6,648 votes), Chas A. Kelley (4,079 votes), Rick Avila (3,425 votes), Michael Ellison-Lewis (466 votes), 42 write-in votes leading to a February general election. (SB Registrar of Voters).

    General Municipal Election February 16, 2005: Patrick J. Morris (10,093 votes) defeats James F. Penman (5,089 votes) in the general election. (SB Registrar of Voters).

    Primary Municipal Election November 3, 2009: Patrick J. Morris (8,349 votes) defeats James F. Penman (5,376 votes) and Rick Avila (1,205 votes). (SB Registrar of Voters).

    Primary Municipal Election 2013: To Be Determined.

     

    Much of local politics is not very exciting.   One of the duties of local elected officials is to speak at neighborhood meetings.

    James F. Penman comments at a neighborhood meeting on a variety of topics.

    This YouTube video appears to be taken by a mobile telephone camera (note the orientation) at a neighborhood meeting in December 2012.  The piece is titled: “SB City Attorney Tells Neighborhood to Lock Doors, Load Guns.” However, the actual video is not particularly exciting.  The opening comments are about medical marijuana (the person uploading the video is named “MedicalMarijuana411.”   He goes on to speak about the bankruptcy, the CalPERS hearing, and crime, including AB 109, homeless camps and vigilantism (he’s against it).

    I’ve heard the City Attorney speak to the public many times, before, during and after my tenure with the City.  This meeting is typical of his tone and comments, and his pronunciation of the word “San Bernardino.”

    As to the title “SB City Attorney Tells Neighborhood to Lock Doors, Load Guns.”

    What he actually says is, starting at 9:17 after saying  that you cannot take the law into your own hands:

    I would not advise anyone .  . . who has children at home . . . to keep a loaded firearm in the house.  You are asking for trouble.  Children from toddlers to teens are attracted to guns.   [Unintelligible] high in a closet, they will get chairs and everything else–toddlers will– I know the tragic case involving a four year old, who,  the father was a police officer, gun was up in the top shelf of the closet little guy climbed up somehow, got it, shot himself. Horrible case. None of you want that to happen.  If you have children at home, I don’t care if they are seventeen, teenagers, you know, to four, three, two, whatever, don’t keep a loaded gun.  If you’ve never had any training in firearms, you should not run out and buy a gun, you should get training first, there are places you can get it, gun stores, uh, have information on courses, the Sheriff’s Department has an excellent program called [Unintelligible] Beware and you can go to the Sheriff’s Department and sign up for that or call there, and they give you training on how to harden yourself as a target, uh, what to watch out for, how to avoid situations, they also give you hands-on training on shooting rifles, shotguns and hand guns. If you don’t have children at home, if you do know how to handle a weapon . . .San Bernardino is that dangerous now, my advice is when you go home, if that’s your situation, lock your doors, if you have guns, load them. I’m not quite out of time, but I’ll stop.  Sure, Thank you very much.  [Applause]

    This echoes his earlier comments in late November on the same issue.  However, the easier thing to say is “SB City Attorney Tells Neighborhood to Lock Doors, Load Guns.”  The actual statement is more nuanced.

     

     

     

    Action minutes are basically a version of the agenda with information regarding actions taken, with little information about what happened.  The City of San Bernardino keeps action minutes.  This practice appears to have started under Rachel Clark, the former City Clerk, and continued under the current regime of City Clerk Georgeann “Gigi” Hanna.  The minutes of January 23, 2012 (under Rachel Clark are action minutes), but the minutes of January 18, 2012 are not action minutes.  Yet, the March 5, 2012 minutes, under Gigi Hanna’s term, are not action minutes.  However, by March 20, 2012, the minutes are action minutes.

    Here is an example from the draft minutes of the December 3, 2012 Mayor and Common Council Meeting:

    7H. Public Works
    Direct Staff to Prepare Amendments to Existing Agreements with Burrtec and Republic for Waste, Recyclables and Greenwaste Processing
    Council Member Kelley made a motion, seconded by Council Member Marquez, to direct staff to prepare amendments to existing agreements with Burrtec and Republic for a five-year term, with a single five-year extension option for waste, recyclables and greenwaste processing for the Mayor and Common Council’s approval. No vote was taken.
    Council Member McCammack made a substitute motion, seconded by Council Member Valdivia, to direct staff to prepare amendments to existing agreements with Burrtec and Republic for a ten-year term, with five one-year extension options for waste, recyclables and greenwaste processing for the Mayor and Common Council’s approval. The vote was taken following further discussion.
    Joint Regular Meeting Minutes December 3, 2012
    Mayor and Common Council of the City of San Bernardino Page 9 Printed 12/26/2012
    Motion: Direct staff to prepare amendments to existing agreements with Burrtec and Republic for a ten-year term, with five one-year extension options for waste, recyclables and greenwaste processing for the Mayor and Common Council’s approval; and give the City Manager and the City Attorney authorization to begin the commencement date of the two agreements earlier if the needs of the bankruptcy court and the litigation with the County so require. RESULT: VOTE FOR APPROVAL VETOED BY MAYOR MOVER: Wendy J. McCammack, Council Member, Ward 7 SECONDER: John Valdivia, Council Member, Ward 3 AYES: Robert D. Jenkins, John Valdivia, Chas A. Kelley, Wendy J. McCammack NAYS: Virginia Marquez, Fred Shorett, Rikke Van Johnson
    Motion: Direct staff to prepare amendments to existing agreements with Burrtec and Republic for a five-year term, with a single-five-year extension option for waste, recyclables and greenwaste processing for the Mayor and Common Council’s approval; and give the City Manager and the City Attorney authorization to begin the commencement date of the two agreements earlier if the needs of the bankruptcy court and the litigation with the County so require. RESULT: ADOPTED [4 TO 3] MOVER: Fred Shorett, Council Member, Ward 4 SECONDER: Virginia Marquez, Council Member, Ward 1 AYES: Virginia Marquez, Fred Shorett, Chas A. Kelley, Rikke Van Johnson NAYS: Robert D. Jenkins, John Valdivia, Wendy J. McCammack

    Yes, these minutes say what happened and the vote, but they lack any information about the substance of what the council members were discussing.  Just that the “vote was taken following further discussion.  In today’s San Bernardino Sun, attorneys for CalPERS are complaining that they can’t get information about what happened at meetings.  This particular item was contentious, but we cannot get a flavor for what happened by looking at the minutes.  We would have to go to either a secondary source, such as the twitter feeds, if available from journalists, or a newspaper account.  In the alternative, if it is available, we would have to look at the video of the meeting.

    However, as time goes by, the minutes are often the only account of what happened.  Not just the final score, which can be found in an adopted resolution or ordinance or action minutes.  The minutes give important information about the legislative intent of a particular action.  I’m eventually writing a post on the history of the City of San Bernardino’s property maintenance ordinance.  Action minutes would not have given this information:

    Colleen Holthouse, 1123 East 35th Street, asked questions regarding the provisions in the proposed ordinance for recreational vehicles and motor homes.

    Mayor Holcomb explained the existing law with respect to recreational vehicles and stated that the proposed ordinance will not change what is presently in effect. Recreational vehicles
    will be allowed to park on improved surfaces.  Minutes of the Mayor and Common Council Meeting, September 9, 1989.

    This information is interesting, at least mildly, historically because it tells of what the public was interested in regarding the proposed ordinance.  This information is also legally interesting, at least mildly, because it provides some legislative history regarding the adoption of the ordinance, which provides the majority of the current property maintenance ordinance (though there are now prohibitions on parking recreational vehicles that were passed later).

    Thus, action minutes are terrible because they do not accurately reflect what happened at a council meeting, they are more a box score than an account of a game, to use a baseball analogy.  They should be abandoned, and detailed minutes should be taken.