California 47th Assembly District

    From a press release from Assembly Member Brown’s office:

    The satellite office is located at Fontana City Hall, 8353 Sierra Avenue. The satellite office will be staffed Monday through Thursday from 9:00am – 5:00pm at the City Hall Conference Room.

    The district office is located at the Vanir Tower, 290 North D Street, Suite 903 in San Bernardino.

    I have not been in an a district office since the early 2000s, when their was a slew of them in the then-EDA owned building at 201 North E Street, which I assume was a way for state and federal office holders to spend state and federal funds in the district, and help support local municipalities, as well as to serve local constituents.   The ones in 201 North E Street that I can remember from my visits to the City of San Bernardino’s Code Enforcement Department (as it was named during my tenure with the City) were Senator Diane Feinstein’s Inland Empire office, Representative Joe Baca’s district office, and Assembly member John Longville’s district office.  When I was with the City of Redlands, I, as one of a number of staff, visited then-Representative Jerry Lewis’ district office on Brookside Avenue.  It was a meeting with Jerry Lewis, but I think that’s the only time I ever have seen an elected official in their district office.  However, it was also the only time I attended a meeting with an outside (non-City) elected official outside of a legislative body.

    In my experience copper theft is a terrible problem for public utilities, property owners, and most of all for local municipal entities, and by extension residents, citizens, and taxpayers.  This is from a press release from Assemblymember Cheryl R. Brown:

     

    SACRAMENTO – Assemblymember Cheryl R. Brown (D-San Bernardino) introduced AB 801 to help prevent the continued problem of copper theft in California. The bill would require junk dealers to ascertain proof of ownership from a person who is selling copper or copper alloy with identifying insignias or emblems on it.

    “Copper theft is problem throughout California, and is costing the state and municipalities millions of dollars to repair the damage,” said Assemblymember Brown. “Junk dealers need to be held responsible for knowingly purchasing stolen copper.”

     

    Under current law, stealing more than $950 of copper is categorized as grand theft and punishable by fines up to $10,000 and three years in jail. A junk dealer who knowingly buys copper can be fined up to $1,000.

     

    As the price of copper has increased, so has the cost to repair the damage caused by metal thieves. Copper has more than doubled in value in the last five years, going from $1.50 per pound to $3.70 per pound. As a result, copper theft has become a costly burden to the state. In the Inland Empire, copper theft caused over 25,000 residents to experience a blackout in 2011. In San Francisco, 59 traffic meters were replaced at a cost of $35,000 per meter due to copper theft and Fresno County has over one million dollars in metal theft annually.

     

    AB 801 would allow the state to effectively track stolen copper and copper alloys. “Copper theft has had negative consequences everywhere in California, especially in the Inland Empire and we need to do everything we can to address this problem,” said Assemblymember Brown.

     

    The bill was introduced and has been moved to the Assembly Rules Committee for assignment to the appropriate policy committee.

     

    Assemblymember Cheryl R. Brown represents the 47th Assembly District, which includes Colton, Fontana, Grand Terrace, Rialto, San Bernardino, and the unincorporated communities of Bloomington and Muscoy.

     

     

    A fairly recent press release sent on December 31, 2012:

    Assemblymember Cheryl R. Brown (D-San Bernardino) was sworn-in locally at the San Bernardino County Government Center in San Bernardino on Friday, December 21. The ceremony was attended by 200 supporters, local elected officials, friends and family members.

     

    Assemblymember Brown represents the 47th Assembly District, which includes San Bernardino, Rialto, Colton, Fontana, Bloomington, Muscoy, and Grand Terrace.
    The Honorable Wilmer Amina Carter, State Legislature (Ret.), served as the Mistress of Ceremonies. The presentation of the colors was presented by Carter High School’s JROTC, led by Colonel Dave Moreland. The program featured special remarks from San Bernardino County Supervisor Janice Rutherford, Second District, Mayor Acquanetta Warren, City of Fontana, Mayor Deborah Robertson, City of Rialto, and longtime San Bernardino community activist, Lois Carson. A special performance was given by jazz saxophonist, J. Boykin, and the oath of office was administered by San Bernardino County Supervisor, Josie Gonzales, Chair of the Board of Supervisors.

    During her remarks, Assemblywoman Brown spoke about the economic uncertainty faced by the newly drawn 47th Assembly District. She emphasized the need to work together as a community to effect change. “In order to make our vision a reality, we need to work together,” said Assemblywoman Brown. “I have already begun the process of moving forward to accomplish common goals by meeting with mayors of San Bernardino, Colton, Rialto, Fontana, and Grand Terrace.”

     

    Brown stated that her vision is to ensure that everyone works together in the 47th District to prepare skilled and educated workers for employment as we improve and create economic opportunities and development. She spoke about the history of the Inland Empire reflecting on its prosperity and optimism. Ultimately, her vision is to see the district thrive.

     

    Assemblywoman Brown has made economic development (jobs and business), education and public safety her top priorities. She said her plan is to continue to meet with educational, labor, business, community groups, as well as, elected officials in the district to generate new ideas, regulatory and legislative solutions that will promote educational opportunities and economic growth in the 47th District.

    Brown 057 edit

     

    From Assemblymember Cheryl Brown’s Office:

     

    Assemblymember Cheryl R. Brown (D-San Bernardino) will be sworn-in locally at the San Bernardino County Administrative Building on Friday, December 21.

     

    Last week, Brown was sworn-in on Monday, December 3 at the California State Capitol in Sacramento to represent the 47th Assembly District.

     

    Assemblymember Brown represents the 47th Assembly District, which includes San Bernardino, Rialto, Colton, Bloomington, Fontana, Muscoy, and Grand Terrace.

     

    “In addition to the state ceremony, which occurred last week, I have decided to hold a local swearing-in ceremony because so many people couldn’t go to Sacramento last week. I want my constituents to be a part of their government,” said Assemblywoman Brown.

     

    During the event, Brown will share her legislative and district priorities, which include meeting with educational, local political, legislative, and community leaders to generate new ideas that will promote educational opportunities and economic growth.

     

    “Education and job creation are critical to our economy,” said Brown. “In order to increase our economic growth, we need to make sure that our students are successfully completing their education.”

     

    Supervisor Josie Gonzales, Chair of the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors, will administer the oath of office.

     

    “I’m honored to have Supervisor Josie Gonzales administer the oath of office,” said Brown. “She was one of my most ardent and loyal supporters. She never wavered, and I deeply respect her leadership and early support of my candidacy. She is a person of high integrity and truly cares for her constituents and our community,” concluded Mrs. Brown.

     

    Next Friday’s event will be held at the County’s Administrative Building located at 385 North Arrowhead Avenue in San Bernardino. The ceremony will begin at 11:30 a.m., with a public reception to follow.

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    Cheryl Brown’s office sent this press release, which even though this is not a news site nor an aggregator, the readership might be interested in reading this information, since the only other place I have seen it is in the Black Voice News:

    In recognition of Small Business Saturday on November 24, Assemblymember-Elect Cheryl R. Brown (D-47) patronized small businesses located in the 47thAssembly District to encourage everyone to shop local and shop small.

    “I’ve owned a small business for almost 40 years and I understand the challenges and sacrifices that business owners encounter daily. I deeply admire and respect the contributions that our small businesses make to the communities in our district,” said Brown.

    Small Business Saturday has attracted millions of consumers nationwide since its formation in 2010. Small Business Saturday occurs annually between Black Friday and Cyber Monday and encourages the nation to celebrate their local businesses by “shopping small.”

    “Reportedly, two-thirds of jobs in the 47th District are provided by small businesses,” said Brown. “And nationally for the last two decades small businesses have created two of every three jobs in the United States.”

    Encouraging small business growth and job creation are among Brown’s top legislative priorities for 2013.

    “Promoting small business growth and job creation is important to me because our district suffers from some of the highest unemployment rates in the state,” said Brown.“In many of our sectors, the unemployment rate has reached double digits. We have to look at how we can create more jobs and strengthen our local economy.”

    “Government policies can pave the way for small businesses to thrive,” said Brown.

    Assemblymember-Elect Brown represents the 47th Assembly District, which includes San Bernardino, Rialto, Colton, Bloomington, Fontana, and Grand Terrace.

    And because I try to add value and not just aggregate information found elsewhere, as a small business owner, and since I have small business clients, I am glad to see Assemblymember-Elect Brown visit local businesses and promoting small businesses.

    While this site focuses on electoral politics, there is certainly a role that government, particularly the California state government can have to be friendly to small business owners.  Many business owners state that they do not like government interference in our free enterprise system, but large businesses often use regulations as barriers to entry for smaller competitors.

    As far as the State Legislature, I would like to point out one law that was passed, AB 1616, which can spur the creation of micro-businesses in at least one field.  The findings of the bill that created this new law are:

    (a) Small businesses have played an important role in helping slow economies recover and prosper as an engine of job creation. During the 1990s, small businesses created the majority of new jobs and now account for 65 percent of United States employment.
    (b) California, and the United States as a whole, are facing growing obesity and obesity-related disease epidemics.
    (1) Two-thirds of American adults and nearly one-third of children and teens are obese or overweight, placing them at risk for developing chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.
    (2) One in every nine California children, one in three teens, and over half of adults are already overweight or obese. This epidemic affects virtually all Californians.
    (3) These health conditions are preventable and curable through lifestyle choices that include consumption of healthy fresh foods.
    (c) For decades, low-income and rural communities have faced limited opportunities to purchase healthy foods. Often, without cars or convenient public transportation options, low-income residents in these areas must rely for much of their shopping on expensive, fatty, processed foods sold at convenience and corner stores.
    (d) There is a growing movement in California to support community-based food production, sometimes referred to as “cottage food,” “artisanal food,” “slow food,” “locally based food,” or “urban agriculture” movements. These movements seek to connect food to local communities, small businesses, and environmental sustainability.
    (e) Increased opportunities for entrepreneur development through microenterprises can help to supplement household incomes, prevent poverty and hunger, and strengthen local economies.
    (f) At least 32 other states have passed laws that allow small business entrepreneurs to use their home kitchens to prepare, for sale, foods that are not potentially hazardous.
    (g) Even some bake sales are currently illegal in California.
    (h) It is the intent of the Legislature to enact a homemade food act specifically designed to help address these challenges and opportunities.
    In that spirit, I wish Assemblymember-Elect Brown good luck in her new term, and sincere wishes that more can be done in the spirit of AB1616 in deregulating the barriers to starting and sustaining new businesses.  As an assemblymember, Cheryl Brown can write laws that help middle class Californians and micro and small businesses expand their businesses without weakening consumer or health and safety protections.

     

     

    Here are the semi-official results in the San Bernardino County Elections, with an emphasis on those races of most important to the City of San Bernardino, the focus of this site:

    These are semi-official results from the November 6, 2012 statewide General Election, which as you may know, coincided with a national presidential election.

    These numbers are from the San Bernardino Registrar of  Voters stats updated at 6:05 a.m. on November 7, 2012.  They will be next updated at 5 p.m.

    Starting with Congress, in Congressional District 8,  Paul Cook appears to have bested Gregg Imus in San Bernardino County 58.15 percent to 41.86 percent with 133,948 votes counted.  According to the Secretary of State (since there are non-San Bernardino County votes in the district (including Mono and Inyo, Paul Cook won by 57.6 percent (82,653 votes), to Gregg Imus’ 42.4 percent (60,732), as of 6:19 a.m.

    In District 31, the Republican-on-Republican violence has ended, with Representative Gary Miller (R-Brea/Diamond-Bar) officially becoming Gary Miller (R-Rancho Cucamonga).  Gary Miller has garnered 68,892 votes so far, for 55.19 percent of the vote, and Bob Dutton getting 55,940 votes at 44.81 percent of the vote.  We’ll look at the implications of this race on the future of San Bernardino politics later.

    In District 35, the battle between local Democrats Gloria Negrete McLeod appears to have defeated Working Joe Baca.  In San Bernardino County, the vote count is currently 46,627 (53.96 percent) to Joe Baca’s 39,788 (46.04 percent).   The Secretary of State has it as Gloria Negrete McLeod at 60,866 votes (55.7 percent), to Joe Baca’s 48,385 (44.3 percent), with 100 percent reporting.  Congressional District 35 has precincts in both Los Angeles and San Bernardino counties.

    Mike Morrell, the Republican candidate has beaten Democrat Russ Warner, by more than 2,000 votes, 51,954 to 49,104 votes.  The contest was for the 40th Assembly District.

    The Baca family misfortune continued with Cheryl R. Brown handily defeating Rialto Council member Joe Baca Jr. for State Assembly District 47.  This district is completely in San Bernardino County, with Cheryl Brown winning 40,871 votes (56.2 percent), and Joe Baca, Jr. winning 31,811 votes (43.8 percent).

    In the San Bernardino Community College District, Gloria Macias Harrison was the big winner with 52,160 votes (16.10 percent), with John Longville, an incumbent, winning the second of four at-large seats, with 42,411 votes (13.09 percent).  The third position goes to Kathleen Henry with 38,344 votes (11.84 percent), whose ballot designation is educator.  In fourth is Nick Zumbos, with 33,573 votes, barely edging out incumbent John Futch, who had 32,490 votes.  That means that one incumbent, John Longville, was reelected, while John Futch, Jess Vizcaino, Jr., and Carleton W. Lockwood, Jr. all lost. Further, with James Ramos winning the Third District Supervisor race, the San Bernardino Community College Board of Trustees is going to look very different.

    Which brings us to the County Supervisor races.  Of course, Josie Gonzales was not on the ballot, having won the primary in June. In the Third District County Supervisor’s Race, Neil Derry lost decisively to James C. Ramos.  Ramos won 53,653 votes (59.09 percent) to incumbent and former San Bernardino City Council member Neil Derry’s 37,143 votes (40.91 percent).  In the First District, which is generally the desert portions of San Bernardino County, a tighter race between Rick Roelle and Robert A. Lovingood.  Lovingood won 38,640 votes (51.22 percent of the vote) to Rick Roelle’s 36,798 votes (48.78 percent).

    In San Bernardino’s sister cities, briefly, Eileen Gomez was reelected as City Clerk handily, only a single candidate was running for City Treasurer, Aurerlio De La Torre, Frank J. Navarro beat Vincent Yzaguirre for Colton City Council District 3, Deirdre H. Bennett won handily in a three person race in District 5 (64.05 percent), and Isaac Suchil won in District 6.

    In Grand Terrace, two new faces appear to have won City Council seats, Sylvia A. Robles, and Jackie Mitchell, with incumbent Darcy McNaboe winning reelection.  Though it is close, it appears that incumbent Lee Ann Garcia has lost, coming in fourth for three seats, by a margin of less than 200 votes with 100 percent of precincts reporting.

    In Highland, both incumbents, John Timmer and Penny Lilburn were reelected, leaving the status quo in the City of Highland.   In Redlands, Mayor Pete Aguilar was resoundingly reelected, with 9,171 votes, 27.24 percent of the total in a seven person race for two seats.  Former Mayor Pat Gilbreath was returned to the Council, coming in second with 6,651 votes, a little less than 500 votes for then next highest vote-getter.  City Clerk stayed the same, and Robert Dawes was elected City Treasurer resoundingly in a three person race., winning 61.81 percent of the votes (10,792).

    In Rialto, Deborah Robertson defeated Ed Scott, and Shawn P. O’Connell  and Ed Palmer were elected to City Council. City Clerk and City Treasurer ran in Soviet-style one person elections.

    Of interest, in the San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District election for Division 2, Gil Navarro beat George Aguilar 8,755 votes to 7,049.

    San Bernardino City Unified School District Measure N, a bond measure, won overwhelmingly,  with 69.60 percent of the vote, needing 55 percent for passage.

    Lastly, Measure Q, put on the ballot by the Board of Supervisors as sort of a poison pill against the citizen initiative Measure R, received more votes than Measure R.  Measure Q received 269,973 votes out of 400,522 votes (67.41 percent), with Measure R receiving receiving 256,014 votes out of 398,468 cast (64.25 percent).

    Measure V in Rialto passed.

    I heretofore have not devoted much space to the race in the California 47th Assembly District race.  I am referring to the newly redistricted 47th Assembly District, not the current district in Los Angeles County.  Though the redistricting maps have a terrible interface, after some review, I have made out the general dimensions of the District.  It is pyramid-shaped and covers all of unincorporated Muscoy, starting on the corner of Highland Avenue and California, heads north on California, excludes Delman Heights in the City of San Bernardino, bisects the 215 north to a point on the 15 (including Glen Helen Regional Park, but none of Devore’s populated places, moving south with both some artificial lines and along a tributary stream to Lytle Creek which is not immediately identifiable on the map, proceeding  west and then south including Hunter’s Ridge in Fontana then back to the 15; then south to roughly Foothill Boulevard in Fontana, then proceeds west around the California Speedway, then proceeding south of the 10, looping around to Etiwanda Boulevard, south to the County line, which then proceeds east along the County line to Reche Canyon Road, north on a zig-zagging along what I believe to be the borders of Grand Terrace, Colton and Loma Linda, north to Barton Road and then Waterman Avenue, up Waterman Avenue bisecting the east and west parts of Hospitality Lane and continuing on past Seccombe Lake to Tenth Street, then proceeding west through Tenth Street in the City of San Bernardino to the 215, across to roughly 16th Street, south on I Street, west on Evans Street, north on Garner, west on 16th Street, south on Mt. Vernon, then west on Evans Street, South on Western, west on West Gilbert, north on Medical Center (excluding the main campus of Community Hospital), west on Highland Avenue, back to to California Avenue.  So, it covers most of Fontana, all of Rialto, all of Grand Terrace, all of Colton, all of Bloomington, and West and Downtown San Bernardino.  It is surrounded by the 40th, the 52nd, the 60th and 61st Assembly Districts.

    Running are former Assembly Member Joe Baca Jr. (and current Rialto Council Member); and a person who has been active in the community for decades, Black Voice News publisher Cheryl Brown.  Both are Democrats in a Democratic plurality district.  Cheryl Brown is also a legislative aide to Assembly Member Carter.

    According to the Registrar of Voters’ September 30, 2012 statistics, there are 167,107 registered voters in the District, of those, 44,433 are registered Republicans, 34,495 are Decline to State, 6,583 are minor parties, and 81,596 are registered Democrats (48.8 percent).  In the primary election in June, four candidates were running, Jeane Ensley, who came in third with 5,787 votes, Thelma E. Beach, who received 1,685 votes, Cheryl Brown, who came in the top two with 7,566 votes, and Joe Baca Jr., who received 11,033 votes and came in first.  In total, 26,071 votes were cast.  At the time, there were 164,082 registered voters, and 27,825 voted.  That means that 1754 voters either did not cast a vote or their vote did not count in the 47th Assembly District race.

    The reason I am writing about this race is because of the interesting dynamics.  I received an interesting link by electronic mail today to a story from the Los Angeles Wave, titled Black woman’s campaign turns Inland Empire party loyalties on their heads.  You’ll need to login to read it. Here is a quote from the lead paragraph: “It is a race between two Democrats and one of them appears to be so personally despised by GOP party leaders, Republican elected officials and ordinarily right-leaning voters, that they are actually donating money to a Democrat’s campaign and endorsing that candidate for election in droves. ”

    The article states that Jim Brulte directed his campaign committee to donate the maximum, $3,900 to Cheryl Brown’s campaign this week.  Other Republican supporters or donors, according to the article are Supervisor Janice Rutherford, Mayor Acquanetta Warren, Riverside County Supervisors John Tavaglione and Marion Ashley and Marge Medoza-Ware.

    The article continues:

    So, why is Brown getting all this love from people who usually don’t care what happens to any Democrat? From what I’ve been able to determine, a lot of people in high places and low places don’t like Baca, who is the son of Joe Baca Sr., the representative from the 43rd Congressional District. It is said that Junior plays fast and loose with the truth and both of them — father and son — tend to offend people in various ways, which people do not forget.

    The reality is that both Cheryl Brown and Joe Baca Jr. have to appeal, particularly in a Presidential election year, to non-Democrats to win elections.  It seems, from the article, that Cheryl Brown understands this.  If this works, the new open primary system may have a moderating effect on the Legislature.